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The Psychology of Eating Podcast

Real people. Real breakthroughs. For more than three decades, Marc David has helped millions discover the true causes of their unwanted eating habits like overeating, binge eating, emotional eating and the inability to lose weight. In this unscripted show, Marc coaches real clients using his unique blend of psychology and nutrition. Whether you want to transform your relationship with food or learn how you can help others, there’s no better place than The Psychology of Eating Podcast, and there’s no better way than hearing the stories of real people.
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Now displaying: July, 2016
Jul 26, 2016

For so many people, having more energy is at the top of the wish list. As full as our schedules may be, we often feel like we could be doing more, if only we had more energy. For this reason, the marketplace is filled with supplements, beverages, and bars that promise a quick energy fix, but these won't sustain you for the long term. So if you've been looking for ways to boost your energy so that you can get more out of life, then please join Emily Rosen, Director of the Institute for the Psychology of Eating, as she shares 5 out-of-the-box nutritional techniques to raise your energy level in a way that's healthy and sustainable. These tips may surprise you, but give them a try and you'll soon find yourself with energy to spare.

Jul 26, 2016

Pamela knows about nutrition. She practices healthy eating and exercises regularly. After working hard on her relationship with food and body, she has made peace with almost every aspect of herself, but one thing still bothers her: her belly. No matter what she tries, she can't seem to get rid of the excess fat that concentrates there. Whenever she's feeling down, she attacks her belly with negative thoughts, and it responds with symptoms of physical discomfort. In this heart-opening session, Marc David, Founder of the Institute for the Psychology of Eating, helps Pamela find a way to work on her belly without attacking herself. Tune in as Pamela learns that she doesn't have to love her belly, but she does need to love herself. Without this key ingredient, happiness and weight loss success will be much harder to find. But with a little love, all things are possible!

Jul 19, 2016

It seems like every few months, a new food fad takes the nutrition world by storm, and everybody, from the diet experts to the bloggers to the celebrity chefs, jumps on the bandwagon. Whether it’s a newly-discovered superfood or a common household item that we need to avoid at all costs, we’re constantly being instructed, “Eat this, but don’t eat that.” It can be hard to keep up with the changing trends - and frustration can arise when a food we thought was OK to love turns up on the “bad” list. Fortunately, there’s an excellent guideline that can help us navigate the shifting nutritional landscape and even enjoy ourselves along the way. In this empowering new podcast episode, Emily Rosen, Director of the Institute for the Psychology of Eating, talks about the key factor that makes the difference between food that depletes our energy, and one that enhances our life force: quality. Tune in and learn why quality is so important when it comes to nutrition, and why a birthday cake that’s made with the best ingredients can be better for you than a kale salad that’s not.

Jul 19, 2016

As a child, Terrie learned to use food as a substitute for love. Throughout her life, she continued to overeat as a way of dealing with painful feelings and stress. She sought bariatric surgery when her weight led to a heart condition, and has kept off the 150 pounds she lost, but continues to struggle with obsessive thoughts about food and with feeling "fat" when her weight fluctuates even a little. Tune in as Marc David, Founder of the Institute for the Psychology of Eating, offers Terrie some surprising advice on how she can begin to reclaim a positive and joyful body image.

Jul 12, 2016

It's amazing how closely linked food and sexuality can be in our mind, often without our even realizing it. We may spend years dieting with the goal of having a more attractive body that will one day bring us our soul mate, or we might find ourselves turning to food for comfort when relationships are stressful. We might even look to certain ingredients as aphrodisiacs when our desire levels seem to be low. There are so many ways our relationship with food can intertwine with our thoughts and feelings toward romance, sexuality and intimacy. Sometimes these connections will be positive and life-affirming, but at other times, our concerns with food can get in the way of our love life. In this eye-opening new podcast episode, Emily Rosen, Director of the Institute for the Psychology of Eating, looks at what can happen when food issues take over - and how we can reclaim our sexuality in the midst of our beautiful human imperfection.

Jul 12, 2016

At a young age, Marta was encouraged by her parents to go on a diet, and ever since, she's been on a roller coaster of weight loss and weight gain that never quite arrives at the goal. When she started to come close to her ideal size, she developed a new obsession with finding the perfect diet to treat hypothyroidism, but she suspected it was just a new way of distracting herself from her underlying dissatisfaction with her life. Tired of draining her energy, she came to Marc David, Founder of the Institute for the Psychology of Eating, for guidance. Tune in as Marc helps Marta find some powerful questions to ask herself and some new shifts to make in her relationship so that she can finally find peace with her body.

Jul 5, 2016

We often think of experiences like falling in love, grieving a death, or standing in awe of a beautiful natural landscape as phenomena of the emotions, of the heart or of the soul. But as the saying goes, we are spiritual beings having a human experience, which means that transcendent and meaningful feelings such as these each have a precise biological component, as well. When we feel pleasure, our brain is producing molecules that cause us to feel pleasure; when we feel humble, our body is making chemicals that trigger this feeling. And just like any chemical reaction that takes place in our body, all of these molecules have a measurable impact on our metabolism. In this fascinating new podcast episode, Emily Rosen, Director of the Institute for the Psychology of Eating, takes a look at the ways our experiences of the sacred can literally change our metabolism, and how we can tap into this often-overlooked source of metabolic power to transform our lives for good.

Jul 5, 2016

Michelle struggled with overeating for years until she finally had a major breakthrough that shifted things in a big way. She thought those challenges were behind her for good - but then the overeating came back. She works hard, and doesn't feel like she has time for self care; she loves what she does but can't seem to find a balance. In this poignant session, Marc David, Founder of the Institute for the Psychology of Eating, helps Michelle see the connection between the lack of self care in her life and her inability to stop overeating. A long-standing habit of people-pleasing has her saying "yes" to everyone else, and "no" to herself. When Michelle learns to put herself and her body first, the urge to overeat begins to loosen its grip.

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